About

Hi, I’m Katie. Although I primarily call myself a writer, I have my finger in a lot of arts-related pies: poet / novelist / lyricist / blogger / arts administrator / workshop leader / project manager / Arts Award adviser / chat show host / occasional frontwoman of a guerrilla poetry mission.

Check out my projects, or my full list of publications, prizes, residencies & commissions.

Represented by: Lucy Luck at Conville + Walsh

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50 word bio (poetry):

Katie Hale is a MacDowell Fellow and Northern Debut Award winner. She is the author of a novel, My Name is Monster (Canongate, 2019), and two poetry pamphlets, whose work has appeared in publications including Mslexia, Under the Radar and Poetry Review. In 2021, she won the Palette Poetry Prize.

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50 word bio (fiction):

Katie Hale is a MacDowell Fellow and Gulliver Travel Grant recipient. Her debut novel, My Name is Monster (Canongate, 2019), was shortlisted for the Kitschies Golden Tentacle, and her short fiction has been longlisted for the Exeter Prize, the Galley Beggar Press Prize and the BBC National Short Story Award.

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100 word bio (poetry):

Based in Cumbria, Katie Hale is the author of a novel, My Name is Monster (Canongate, 2019), and two poetry pamphlets. She is a MacDowell Fellow, a recent winner of the Palette, Prole Laureate and Jane Martin Poetry Prizes, and has twice been shortlisted for the Manchester Poetry Prize. She also writes for theatre and immersive digital performance, and has featured on national television and radio. She is currently working on her first full-length collection, for which she was awarded an Arts Council DYCP grant in 2019, and a Northern Debut Award for Poetry in 2021.

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100 word bio (fiction):

Based in Cumbria, Katie Hale is the author of a novel, My Name is Monster (Canongate, 2019), and two poetry pamphlets. She is a MacDowell Fellow, and recipient of an Authors’ Foundation Grant and the 2022 Gulliver Travel Grant. She also writes for theatre and immersive digital performance, and has featured on national television and radio. Published in Hotel, Joyland and Under the Radar, her short fiction has also been shortlisted for the Desperate Literature Prize, and longlisted for the Galley Beggar Press Prize and the BBC National Short Story Award. She is currently working on a second novel.

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The full story:

Based in the UK, Katie Hale is an internationally recognised novelist & poet, with over a decade’s experience of leading and facilitating creative programmes.

A 2019 MacDowell Fellow and winner of the 2022 Speculative Literature Foundation Gulliver Travel Grant, her Writer in Residence positions have included: Gladstone’s Library (Wales), Hawthornden Castle (Scotland), Passa Porta (Belgium), the Wordsworth Trust (England), Heinrich Böll Cottage (Ireland) and a MacDowell Fellowship (USA). Over the next two years, she will occupy Writer in Residence positions in Georgia, Australia and Svalbard.

Her debut novel, My Name is Monster (Canongate, 2019), was published following Penguin Random House’s inaugural WriteNow mentoring scheme, and has since been translated into German, Italian and Turkish. She has published two poetry pamphlets: Breaking the Surface (flipped eye, 2017), and Assembly Instructions (Southword, 2019), which won the Munster Chapbook Prize. She is currently working on a poetry collection, for which she was awarded an Arts Council England DYCP grant in 2019, and a Northern Debut Award for Poetry in 2021.

Other recent awards for her poetry have included the Palette Poetry Prize, the Prole Laureate Competition, and Jane Martin Prize. She was also runner up in the 2019 Mslexia Poetry Prize, and has been shortlisted for the Aesthetica Poetry Prize, the University of Canberra Vice Chancellor’s Poetry Prize, and twice for the Manchester International Poetry Prize. Her poetry has been published in journals including Mslexia, The North, Poetry Review, Magma, bath magg and Under the Radar – and featured in anthologies from Broken Sleep, Folkways and Handstand Press.

Her fiction has appeared in Joyland, Hotel, and Under the Radar, and in 2021 she was awarded the Georgia Writers’ House Prize. She has been shortlisted for the Desperate Literature Prize and the Bath Flash Fiction Award, and longlisted for the Exeter Story Prize, the Galley Beggar Press Prize, and the BBC National Short Story Award.

She has also written for radio, theatre and immersive digital performance. During lockdown in 2020, she was lead writer on Bella: a site-specific interactive piece of outdoor theatre, produced by Eden Arts and delivered through QR codes at historic locations around Penrith, Cumbria. In 2018, she created a Guerrilla Poetry programme for Kendal Poetry Festival, which has since expanded, and in 2021, became the central physical aspect of an otherwise digital festival.

She has written collaboratively as a lyricist, working with composer Stephen Hyde to create a chamber musical, The Inevitable Quiet of the Crash, which premiered at Edinburgh Fringe in 2017 – and to write songs which have featured in a number of productions by touring theatre company The Three Inch Fools. In 2019, she also worked with international theatre company Théâtre Volière to create a collaborative folk opera, inspired by the history of women in and around Gretna.

Her work for radio has included appearances on BBC Radio 4’s Open Book, Front Row, and Contains Strong Language. In 2021, she was guest poet on Rosie Jones’ Trip Hazard (Channel 4), and in 2019, she wrote and presented the Cumbria episode of Tongue and Talk: The Dialect Poets, produced by Made in Manchester for Radio 4.

Her work has been commissioned by organisations including BBC Radio 4 and BBC Local Radio, National Poetry Day, the Barbican Centre, the National Trust, Passa Porta and Creative Tourist. She has worked as a project officer and administrator for Cumbrian arts organisations including Eden Arts, Prism Arts and the Brewery Arts Centre, and has also worked as a travel feature writer and blogger, collaborating with organisations across the UK, Iceland and Vietnam.

She regularly appears at festivals, both in person and online, and delivers creative workshops for adults and in schools. In recent years, she has facilitated creative workshops for organisations such as the Wordsworth Trust, New Writing North and the Barbican Centre, as well as running her own workshop and event series via Zoom.